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Top shots from Mucky Pirates Bay 03 June

The photo wench found lots of cooperative subjects on another long shore dive at Mucky Pirates Bay. Thanks to the pirates at Sea Rovers for providing shore support.

Moray eel, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Here’s lookin at you kid

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia, juvenile, semicircular angelfish

This is a juvenile angelfish who will look completely different when it grows up

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia, bannerfish, jellyfish

This little bannerfish was busy trying to nibble at the jellyfish

 

Black saddled pufferfish, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

These little puffers are so cute

 

False clownfish, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

One of the smaller false clownfish in the anemone under the pier

Creature Feature–Sand Shrimpgoby & Shrimp

Sand shrimpgoby, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Meet the sand shrimpgoby

One of the joys of diving for me is learning about and trying to photograph behavior. Today’s photos are not really portfolio-worthy, but they show the interesting relationship between the sand shrimpgoby and the shrimp they share a home with.

These two creatures are symbiotic (meaning their interaction benefits both of them). The gobies stand guard while the shrimp plays “housekeeper” to their burrow, continually digging and cleaning out the sand. The Gobies will signal when predators are near. When I got too close, they both dashed back into the hole. The fish came back out first, followed by the shrimp a few moments later, then the housecleaning continued.

Sand shrimpgoby, shrimp, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Here’s you can see the shrimp doing some housecleaning while the goby is on lookout

 

Sand shrimpgoby, shrimp, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Another shot of the pair–all of the floating sand was brought out by the shrimp

 

Sand shrimpgoby, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Here’s a closeup of the goby’s face–looks like he has a mouth full of sand so I guess he shares in the cleaning chores

I ain’t afraid of no shark

Reef shark, Roatan, Honduras

Unusually close because it was a baited shark dive in Honduras

If you’re like me, one of the first things most people ask when they find out you scuba dive is, “aren’t you afraid of sharks?” I always answer “Oh no, I so rarely see a shark; it’s always exciting, and I swim towards them to get a photo.” They eye me skeptically, so I follow up by saying that I’m more afraid of the stray dogs that live on my street than I am of sharks. So, here are some interesting statistics to share with these dubious folks.

According to the International Shark Attack File (ISAF), between 1958 and 2016 there were a total of 548 fatalities from sharks. That is an average of 9.45 fatalities per year. Of those fatalities, only 8% were snorkelers or divers (more than half were surfers).

So, what kills more people each year than sharks? Here’s a list that may surprise you:

ANIMALS & INSECTS

Mosquitoes – 800,000 worldwide

Hippos – 2900 worldwide

Bees – 100 in the US

Ants – 50 in the US

Jellyfish – 40 worldwide

Dogs – 30 in the US / 25,000 worldwide

Cows – 20 in the US

Horses  – 20 in the US

OTHER THINGS/ACTIVITIES

Texting (while driving) – 2900 in the US

Falling out of bed – 450 in the US

Falling coconuts – 150  worldwide

Popping champagne corks – 24 worldwide

Taking selfies  – 18 worldwide

Falling icicles – 15 in the US

 

So, now that you’re armed with some statistics, go out and convince all your friends to discover scuba diving!

Shore Dive at Mucky Pirates Bay with Brethren David

Brethren David wanted to check out the amazing shore dive at Mucky Pirates Bay here in Pemuteran, so we enlisted dive guide Edy to find some unusual macro subjects for our cameras. We were definitely not disappointed.

David–be sure to send us some of YOUR photos to post on the website!

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

This fangblenny found a home in a discarded piece of PVC pipe

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

This shy moray eel wouldn’t venture out of his hole

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

I tried to move in for a close-up of the eye, but he dashed back into his hole in a cloud of sand

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

This juvenile lionfish was TINY–thanks to Edy for finding this little gem

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Lots of pipefish on this dive

 

 

Menjangan Memories 30May17

Box Reef, Menjangan, Bali, Indonesia, wall dive

First shot of the dive–(decent composition, good exposure) sometimes I surprise myself

Dive guide Edy was tasked today with finding interesting subjects for 2 underwater photographers (Dave from London, and the photo wench) at Menjangan. Our first dive was at Box Reef, and the current was strong–both Dave & I tucked in our cameras and drifted along. Eventually, the current lessened and strobes started firing. I took the opportunity to frame both of them against the lovely wall for a couple of portrait shots.

Box Reef, Menjangan, Bali, Indonesia, wall dive

Here’s Edy working on his modeling skills.

 

Box Reef, Menjangan, Bali, Indonesia, wall dive

Here’s brethren Dave posing for the camera

 

After a surface interval including drinks and lunch, our second dive was at Mangrove. This was a much more relaxed dive with little current, great visibility and lots to see. I spent much of the dive trying to get a shot of a lone bumphead parrotfish who would have nothing to do with me–camera-shy I guess. So, after fighting with a subject that’s so uncooperative, it’s always nice to find a lovely anemone filled with false clownfish–always a crowd-pleaser and a great way to end a 73-minute dive.

Mangrove, Menjangan, Bali, Indonesia, anemone, false clownfish

There was lots of activity at this purple anemone.

 

 

Top 3 Photos from today at Mucky Pirates Bay

The resident photo wench did another long shore dive today (138 minutes) at Mucky Pirates Bay with the helpful support pirate crew from Sea Rovers. Although not as productive as yesterday photo-wise (no trusty guide to find critters), I thought I’d post the top 3 shots. Enjoy!

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Surprisingly, this little guy let me get close enough for the +10 diopter

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia

Another patient little fish that let me get quite close

 

Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia, Chromodoris, nudibranch

A peek under the mantle of a Chromodoris nudibranch

Photo Wench Dives Mucky Pirates Bay

Kat Ramage, shore diving, Mucky Pirates Bay, Pemuteran, Bali, Indonesia, Sea Rovers

The photo wench takes her new camera for her first shore dive at Mucky Pirates Bay

 

After being sick for most of May, I was excited to take my new camera for my first dive to Mucky Pirates Bay with Abdul from Sea Rovers. We enjoyed a very leisurely 120 minute dive checking out the residents below the pier and out to the moorings. Here is some of what we saw.

Pipefish, Pemuteran, Bali, Mucky Pirates Bay, shore dive, Sea Rovers

Friendly pipefish

 

Nudibranch, Pemuteran, Bali, Mucky Pirates Bay, shore dive, Sea Rovers

You don’t always get to see under the skirt of a nudibranch

 

Lionfish, Pemuteran, Bali, Mucky Pirates Bay, shore dive, Sea Rovers

This lionfish was too big for my lens, so I got a closeup of his face

 

Scorpionfish, Pemuteran, Bali, Mucky Pirates Bay, shore dive, Sea Rovers

I thought Abdul pointed me to a clump of sand until I looked at it with the 10x diopter–a TINY scorpionfish

 

False clownfish, Pemuteran, Bali, Mucky Pirates Bay, shore dive, Sea Rovers

Who doesn’t love Nemo? There’s a nice anemone with false clownfish at 6-7 meters so it’s a great place for your safety stop

 

Stylized Nudi

Just a bit of playing around with old photos and photoshop. Stylized block print of a skirted nudibranch taken while diving Pemuteran.

Menjangan Island Underwater Clean Up

Sunday at West Bali National Park a team of 60 divers (Sea Rovers included) assembled to collect the plastic waste that had got stuck on the reefs around Menjangan island.

Apparently a whopping 128 kilograms of plastic waste was removed from around Menjangan Island in West Bali National Park over this weekend.

The divers came from West Bali National Park, East Java’s Alas Purwo National Park, the Perancak Marine Observation and Research Agency, plus divecentres around the Northwest Bali area, particularly Pemuteran bay.

Most the waste was food and drink plastic packaging. The rubbish was collected and transported off Menjangan Island by boat at the end of the day.

“Within an average week, the total amount of garbage transported out of Menjangan reaches approximately 300 kilograms which doesn’t even include the trash removed from the reef,” Tribun Bali.

“The total garbage collected from February to May 2017 reached three tons for Menjangan Island. The entire West Bali National Park area reached five tons,” West Bali National Park Manager Wiryawan told Tribun on Sunday.

Sad that much of the rubbish that tourist complain about also comes from the tourists doing the complaining. Sometimes directly and more often indirectly. Dispose of your waste wisely and use companies that do the same.

Here at Sea Rovers all our plastic bottles are collected for recycling, our lunchboxes are Tupperware style reusable and softdrinks come in glass bottles, which we own and just buy the refills for. A common practice here in Indonesia. As Pirates we wipe the with our t-shirts and drink from the bottles. No plastic straws for us!

So next time you’re at Menjangan Island and you see trash, do your bit. Pick it up and bring it back for proper disposal. Be part of the solution instead of mourning about it online.

Sea Rovers Message in e-bottle The pirates who dive
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