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Guide for the Metrically-Impaired – Temperature

Speaking as an American, when I hear the water temperature is 29 degrees, I momentarily freak-out until I remember that this is in Celcius. But even then, I’m not exactly sure what that means (if I don’t have my trusty Smartphone to make the conversion for me). So here’s a guide, plus some exposure suit recommendations from scubadiving.com.

°CELCIUS °FAHRENHEIT WARM-BLOODED DIVERS EASILY CHILLED DIVERS
above 29° above 84.2° bathing suit or dive skin 1-2mm shorty or full suit
27° – 29° 80.6° – 84.2° dive skin or 1-2mm shorty/full suit 1-2mm full suit
23° – 26° 73.4° – 78.8° 2mm shorty or 2-3mm full suit 3mm-5mm full suit
19° – 25° 66.2° -77° 3mm – 5mm full suit 5mm-7mm full suit
15° – 18° 59° – 64.4° 5mm-7mm full suit 7mm full suit + 2mm shorty
below 15°  below 59° You are not likely in Bali Brrrrrrrr!

Currently the water temp in Pemuteran is 28-29 degrees. Only once in Bali have I experienced the 15-18 degree range–September 2015 down in the south at Crystal Bay to see the mola-molas. Last year it was much warmer and apparently not many molas were found due to the higher temperatures.

You can always contact the Sea Rovers office before your trip to decide what exposure protection you need to bring. Here’s a tip for those easily-chilled: invest in a hood; it’s small and light-weight and can make a big difference in your comfort level.

 

Guide for the Metrically Impaired – Tank Pressure

3 types of pressure gauges

Both systems in one plus color coding–I like it

 

Today’s topic in our series ‘Guide for the Metrically Impaired’ is tank pressure. Those of us familiar with the Imperial system measure tank pressure in psi while the rest of the world uses bar.  So if the divemaster says that you need to turn around and head back to the boat when you have 125 bar, or you need to be back on the boat with 50 bar, how do you comply if your gauge is in psi? Most importantly, listen to the dive briefing and pay attention to the guidelines and hand signals. Here are some handy conversions:

Full tank                                                               3000-3200psi                     200-250 bar

Turn-around point or start

ascending to a shallower depth                      1000-1250 psi                     100-125 bar

Safety stop / low on Air                                     750 psi                                 50 bar

Low on air / Very low on air                             500 psi                                 30 bar

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Guide for the Metrically Impaired – Depth

Yes, fellow Americans…this means you. If you have never been diving outside the US or the Caribbean, you might be really confused by your dive briefing–“The sandy bottom is at 25 meters. The water temperature is around 21 degrees. How many kilos do you need? When you get to 80 bar, ascend to your safety stop at 5 meters for 3-5 minutes.” Or, the divemaster points to his gauge asking how much air you have left and you indicate 1 (for 1000psi), and all you get back is a confused (or maybe panicked) look.

Today’s quick guide – Depth

Depth gauge in feet

You are used to this.

Depth gauge in meters

Your rental says this

 

What you need to know

3 metres=10 feet         Use for Safety Stop

5 metres=15 feet         Use for Safety Stop

18 metres = 60 feet     Open Water depth Limit

30 metres = 100 feet   Advanced Open Water depth Limit

40 metres = 130 feet   Recreational Diving depth limit

Next time– Aren’t bars the places to get beer?

 

 

 

Still time to meet Captain Paul at ADEX in Singapore

Sea Rovers, Abyss Oceanworld & Reef Seen representing NW Bali Diving at ADEX

L-R Daniel Stilwell (from Abyss Oceanworld), our very own Cap’n Paul Turley of Sea Rovers, and Paul Brown (from Reef Seen) representing NW Bali Diving at ADEX

If you be in Singapore, check out the ADEX Ocean 17 Festival. You can meet Captain Paul at the NW Bali Diving booth L25. Stop by to shake his hand, down some rum, or better yet–sign up for a trip to dive/snorkel with Sea Rovers in lovely Pemuteran, Bali.

 

Watch some cool UW videos

ADEX Ocean 17 Festival

Weather shuts down Menjangan trips and Rubbish Alert

Normally the crossing from Pemuteran to Menjangan Island is a pleasant 25-minute ride on our comfortable boats. For the past 2 days, however, the Port Authority halted trips to Menjangan due to weather conditions. Hopefully weather conditions will improve and diving will resume tomorrow.

UNFORTUNATELY, however, the rubbish that washes in won’t go away as quickly. Our guests earlier this week were disheartened (as were we) to see considerable rubbish along the shore and in the water in both Menjangan and Pemuteran.

Plastic rubbish washing up on the beach

We are all saddened when we see this

During rainy season, after strong storms anytime and whenever the seas are high, this is what you will find along coastlines all over Indonesia. It’s an ongoing problem without an easy solution. Sea Rovers and many other dive operators do their part locally to pick up trash in organized beach clean-ups. Our dive guides often return with BCD pockets filled with rubbish they have picked up during their dives. We have a plastic recycling program and do everything we can as a business to minimize our impact on the environment.

We will always do our best to choose dive/snorkel sites with the least amount of garbage, but sometimes it is unavoidable.

Since when did Mother Nature become a litterbug?

Really?! A ‘nature’ phenomenon?!

Coming to Singapore and an ADEX near you

promoting NW Bali at ADEX

Final Preparation for ADEX 2017, Singapore 7th, 8th & 9th April @Suntec

Getting ready for ADEX, this weekend where, left to right, Daniel (Abyss), Chris (Reef Seen) and myself, the infamous Captain Paul of Sea Rovers 😉  Will be doing our best to promote Northwest Bali Diving & Snorkeling.

There will also be a special prize draw. So come on down to Suntec Singapore Convention & Exhibition Centre, Level 4, Halls 401 – 404, and sign yourself aboard.

You’ll find us opposite the Ocean Gallery at booth L25.

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